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guilt
 

John Ruskan's
Emotional Clearing

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Self-blame, or guilt, is a variation of the basic blame dynamic. It is a self-serving mechanism calculated to avoid owning and feeling on a deeper level. By blaming ourselves, we protect ourselves just as blaming others will protect the ego from the realization of its responsibility for its experience.

Self-blame is not the same
as taking responsibility

Spiritual seekers, when first realizing that they are responsible for their experience, may fall into the trap of blaming themselves rather than others. The result is still self-rejection, preventing them from going further in their work. You must realize that your Karma has been formed out of ignorance, not deliberate intention; it is simply the result of where you are on the evolutionary journey.

If you feel self-blame because you think you are responsible for someone else’s condition, you should realize that you are reacting inappropriately. Relationships are always mutual, meaning there is mutual consent. Others also have their Karma and have chosen the relationship to bring their experience to themselves, although, of course, this does not condone deliberate mistreatment of others.

Intellectual therapies, in particular, take a long time to resolve unconscious blame or guilt. How should this be handled in processing? The guilt of the mind needs to be reconditioned, not accepted. The principle of affirmation can be used effectively here.

 
 

© 2004 John Ruskan / The Institute for Integrative Processing