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psychotherapy
 

John Ruskan's
Emotional Clearing

Emotions

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inner child
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performance optimization
positive attitude
psychotherapy
relationships
repression
sadness
self-rejection
spirit releasement
stress
substance addiction / abuse
suppression
the subconscious
trauma
worry

The central purpose of all psychotherapy is to clear suppressed material that is affecting us adversely. Suppression is the primary psychological mechanism that leads to emotional and spiritual dysfunction. Suppression is something that we all do. Those who reach the point of severe distress have merely gone further in suppressing than the average person; those who are considered well balanced suppress less than normal. The standard of emotional health in our society, therefore, is far below the potential possible for humankind, but this just has to do with our current evolutionary level of growth.

For the past fifty years or so, psychological therapy has been the most common means for people in the West to receive help in dealing with stressful emotional conditions or simply to become more sensitive to themselves. Before therapy became available, such help was provided by the church. Today the psychological has largely become separated from the spiritual. Spirituality is often overlooked, or not desired, by persons who turn to psychology for assistance.

The therapeutic effort is devoted, first, to uncovering or making conscious the feelings and patterns that are unconsciously influencing the client in undesirable ways. Second, therapy is directed toward releasing stored negativity through various approaches, depending on the school.

The therapist accepts the client

Regardless of the approach, therapists who are effective share a common quality: They accept the client without conditions. Unconditional acceptance can be startling and transformative, because the problem is not what the client usually thinks it is. The real problem is that the client is not self-accepting, often not even having any concept of self-acceptance. Through the therapist, the client learns how to accept him- or herself, outgrowing negative patterns.

During therapy, blocks are uncovered and loosened up, and the client becomes aware of self-limiting tendencies. This happens primarily because of the therapist’s attitude of acceptance, not because of incredible insights or wonderfully effective techniques. The therapeutic use of acceptance can be understood and applied only by one who has mastered self-acceptance on a deep level; it is fallacious to assume that one who is not whole within could ever provide this kind of healing for another. A successful outcome to therapy is achieved when the client no longer needs the supportive energy of the therapist but can provide support through self-acceptance. The client has not become a perfect human being but is now self-sustaining, able to provide nurturing and healing from within.

 
 

© 2004 John Ruskan / The Institute for Integrative Processing