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repression
 

John Ruskan's
Emotional Clearing

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When the suppression syndrome becomes unconscious, it is called repression. Repression is the same as suppression, except there is no awareness of feelings or the avoidance of them. For example, if you are sad but do not consciously recognize your sadness, it becomes repressed. Proper release is not possible, and the sadness is stored subconsciously.

Repression, unfortunately, is common in the modern world. Freud, in Civilization and Its Discontents, said he thought it was unavoidable. His statement is even more appropriate today. Repression comes about because of all the desensitizing we undergo. Life is so busy, so anxiety ridden, with our attention constantly enticed outward, we do not realize what our real feelings are. We have lost touch with ourselves.

Continual repression results in neurosis and extensive blocking of the human organism. The result on the emotional level is addiction, depression, and unconscious destructive patterns; and on the physical level, disease. Blocked energy easily can reach the level where it affects the physical, and what is disease but blockage? Looking at prevalent twentieth-century ailments such as heart disease and cancer, it’s hard to avoid concluding that a main cause is the buildup of subconscious negative forces that the modern way of life encourages.

 
 

© 2004 John Ruskan / The Institute for Integrative Processing