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obsessive-compulsive
 

John Ruskan's
Emotional Clearing

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We are subject to the law of duality most strongly when addicted to the satisfaction of any desire. Addicted, we are compulsive; we must have the object in question. Addicted, fulfillment is highly dualistic, alternating between pronounced, neurotic pleasure and pain. Our need and belief systems are artificial, obsessive, compulsive, and addictive, setting us up for strong dualistic experiences. When not addicted to outcomes, we do not go through the same intensity of dualistic swings, if only because we do not look for intense satisfaction to come from the activity. We are more relaxed and don’t need as much to be happy.

Processing brings growth

Growth is gradual; we learn we don’t need this and then that. The elimination of compulsive needs, or being obsessive about what we think we just have to have, is an important part of personal liberation. But exactly how is growth achieved? You cannot free yourself from compulsive, addictive needs by an act of will. It is only when you use the intellect to move to a place of processing that growth and real change begin. Processing and clearing of the feelings associated with addictive and unsatisfied needs results in a gentle, natural outgrowing of them. Do not force yourself to be something you are not; do not want to be something other than what you are. In accepting yourself as you are, you allow growth to occur.

Dualistic Projection

An important insight is understanding how we become trapped in obsessive-compulsive dualistic projection. In an effort to avoid the negative, we become compulsive about the positive. We do not see they are related, that one depends on the other for its existence, that they are two sides of the same coin.

We think that we can do away with the negative by attaining more of the positive, but eventually we come to realize that the negative can never be eliminated by more of the positive; in fact, when we attain more of the positive, the negative only increases; they must balance each other. The negative must be faced and released directly. Understanding this is one of the turning points of inner work.

When you realize that you have been pursuing some particular attainment compulsively, whether it takes the form of relationship, money, or recognition in order to eliminate an inner feeling such as loneliness, insecurity, or worthlessness, you begin serious work. You see the futility of what you have been doing; you confront the feeling that has been driving you, often unconsciously. You begin to work with the feeling itself, and your life begins to change.

Integration means accepting
and including the negative

Instead of trying to separate one part of life from another, we acknowledge that the negative is integral to any particular experience; that the experience could not be without it; indeed, that we ourselves have unconsciously assigned the negative value to balance the forces. We accept and surrender to the negative. As we stop running from the negative, there is bound to be suppressed pain in the subconscious. There is no other way to get rid of this pain except to bring it to the surface and experience it. This is what is done in therapy. Facing the negative is a necessary part of the healing process.

 
 

© 2004 John Ruskan / The Institute for Integrative Processing